Chicago Dentist · gum disease

Show Love To Your Oral Health

Whether you choose to deny it or not, it’s the month of love. February is American Heart Month. Did you know there’s a connection between your heart and oral health? If you plan on stuffing yourself with a ton of sweets, you should be careful! Your teeth need love as well, don’t forget about them.

Yes, it’s true, gum disease increases your risk for heart disease. Lack of care for your teeth and gums can lead to gum disease. If it’s not treated, plaque and bacteria can make its way to your bloodstream and travel through your body to your heart which can lead to blood clots or possibly heart attacks.

Tips For Healthy Living

Valentine’s day – Date night, some people might say they go hand-in-hand. But If you don’t think so, use this tip for whenever you go out and eat.

  • Keep some floss in your bag or pocket. The quicker you get rid of the food particles and bacteria the better! Also, water is the best drink for your teeth, it rinses away acids from your teeth. Pro Tip: order water with your meals.
  • Dark chocolate is actually good for your teeth! Well, in moderation of course. It contains less sugar than milk chocolate and can help with preventing cavities and tooth decay. Chocolates that have a chewy sugary center will more likely cling to your teeth. Yes, you might like those better, just try to eat a couple rather than the whole box. Candy
  • Gummy candy, you want to try to avoid those! They are the worst candy for your teeth. The bacteria in your mouth set off a chemical reaction that turns the sugar into an acidic form then it eats away at the enamel of your teeth. This is known as demineralization. Also, gummy candy sticks to your teeth. When you think about saliva you might be grossed out but when it comes to your mouth, it’s a good thing. It neutralizes acids that come from sugars and protects your teeth.

Alternatives to gummy candy: Xylitol is a sugar replacement that bacteria won’t recognize and doesn’t attack and turn it into acid like they do with sugars. Save your teeth from an attack and read the ingredients!

It’s always a good time for sweets! – WRONG. For some of us, we can’t say no to candy. Eat them after a meal to limit the exposure of sugar and bacteria! Be sure to wash them down with water.

Love is in the air! Did you know that kissing helps prevents cavities? It stimulates saliva and breaks down plaque to get rid of bacteria.

Love Your Teeth

  • Brush twice daily
  • Floss daily
  • Schedule bi-annual teeth cleanings

Those are the basics! Here are a few changes that might benefit you:

  • New toothbrush – your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 months! Use soft bristles, don’t be rough with your gums and teeth. Brush.png
  • New floss? There a bunch of floss out there, don’t be afraid to try something new! Or if you are new to flossing try something and fall in love with how it makes your mouth feel!
  • Toothpaste – Are you loyal to a certain brand? If you can never settle on a certain brand, look for one with an ADA seal! They help remove the plaque from your teeth and protect them from decay and gum disease.
  • Time – sleep in too long or too tired at night to brush your teeth? It’s recommended to brush your teeth for two minutes. Make this change, your mouth and dentist will love you for it! Use a timer while brushing or play your favorite song! It’ll make the time fly by.

Are you wondering if this check-list applies to you if you have dental implants? The answer is: YES, they feel and function like your natural teeth. Which means there shouldn’t be a change in your dental routine.

Treat your heart how it deserves to be treated! Limit your sugar intake, walk or take the stairs rather than the elevator, and take care of your teeth and gums.

 

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

dental health · gum disease · Oral Health · Preventitive · Uncategorized

Is It Genetic or Environmental?

The air is becoming crisper, leaves are changing colors and falling off their trees. It’s that time of year when it’s appropriate to add pumpkin spice to any food or drink and not be judged. #PumpkinSpiceEverything

What’s your favorite part of Thanksgiving gatherings? Do you consider yourself to have a sweet tooth? Here’s something mind-blowing: a sweet tooth might be genetic. So, when you are going for seconds on that pumpkin pie, be sure to show extra gratitude to your parents.

Pumpkin Pie

Some people are born with a weakened sweet taste, which means they need more sugar to taste the same level of sweetness. Studies propose that genes might explain up to 30 percent of how much sugar you can taste.

But wait… there’s more! Is it possible bad teeth run in the family as well?

Tooth Decay

The bacteria in our mouth that cause cavities aren’t there at birth. It most likely comes from family members who kiss their child’s lips, share utensils, or even blow on their foods. Studies show that this bacteria isn’t associated with tooth decay. It also revealed that bacteria that can form cavities were environmental. For example, eating sugary foods and lack of oral care.

Tooth decay is preventable but some people are more at risk. Yes, it’s confusing, but really, what isn’t? Jokes aside, genes control how teeth develop. Often times, dentists look into family history because it might help them understand why a child’s teeth have more decay than someone with a similar diet. You don’t get a say about how your teeth develop, but you can control how often you brush, floss, and visit your dentist!

Size, Shape, and Alignment

Are your teeth crooked because of genetics or environmental factors? If you said both, you’re correct! The size of your jaw, teeth, and mouth are typically decided by DNA. Thumb sucking, accidents, or an unbalanced diet are reasons for crooked teeth that you can’t blame your parents for.

It’s never too late to get your teeth in line! Why should you get them straightened? Crooked or crowded teeth can cause tooth decay, difficulty maintaining your daily oral care, and improper chewing.

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Gum Disease

Did you know half of our population has gum disease? Genetics also play a role in how likely you are to develop periodontal disease. There are tests to run to show if you are affected. The best way to keep your mouth healthy is brushing, flossing, and regular dental check-ups.

Why Are My Teeth Yellow?

It’s a mixture of genes and environment. Typically, if you have thin enamel your teeth will most likely look more yellow. You have no control over the growth of your tooth, but should be aware of what foods and drinks will contribute to the yellowing of your teeth. Example of tooth staining drinks are: coffee or fruit juices; food: berries or tomato sauce.

When it comes to our body developing its natural functions, it usually relies on genes. In conclusion, unhealthy teeth are controlled by both genes and the environment. And ultimately you are in complete control of your daily dental routine.

One of the most important things about knowledge is being able to share it. While you are devouring seconds or thirds you can enlighten everyone else at the table. You can also bring a bag of floss picks to share!

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

Chicago Dentist · gum disease · Oral Surgery · Preventitive

How Much Do You Know About Your Teeth?

Do you consider your teeth as living things? They contain nerves and living tissues and our mouth constantly produces bacteria. They are always active with chewing, biting, talking, and grinding. Dental problems are hardly enjoyable, but on the bright side, most are preventable. Brushing twice a day, flossing daily, regular check-ups, and proper eating is important for preventing future dental problems. The more you know the healthier and cleaner your mouth will be.

Common Dental Problems For All Ages

  • Tooth Decay- Cavities (caries)
  • Gum Disease– Periodontitis

Common Dental Problems For Children

Just because baby teeth aren’t permanent doesn’t mean that they should be neglected! Their tooth enamel is 50% thinner than the enamel on adult teeth. When it starts to decay it will cause more damage faster. Tooth decay is caused by bacteria using sugar from foods and drinks to create acid that deteriorates your teeth.

Are your kid’s thumb suckers? It is a natural self-soothing reflex for them. It’s a hard habit to break but the earlier you try to get them to stop, the easier. After permanent teeth come in it can cause problems with the palatal growth and teeth alignment.

Thumb sucking

Long-Term Effects of Thumb Sucking

  • May form a lisp because of jaw positioning
  • The roof of the mouth changes or can become more sensitive
  • Teeth are pushed around and can result in an overbite or an underbite. Other orthodontic treatment might be needed as well.

Common Dental Problems For Teens

Did you know that about 75% of teens need orthodontic treatment after their adult teeth have grown in? Common problems are teeth being overcrowded, crooked, or having a lot of space in between them. Misplaced teeth are more challenging to clean and maintain leading to problems down the road.

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Does your teenager play contact sports? #PlayItSafe More than 200,000 injuries to the mouth and jaw occur every year. Protect them with a mouthguard! Be sure to keep it clean by rinsing and leaving it in the container when not actively using it.

Avoid oral piercings! A tongue or other mouth piercings can easily chip teeth when asleep, eating, or talking. After the piercing, many experience swelling, which can lead to infections or trouble opening and closing your mouth to speak and eat.

Common Dental Problems For Adults

We have a third set of molars, known as wisdom teeth that typically emerge after the rest of our adult teeth. They can cause pain and create crowding leading to more dental problems in the future. 85% of adults have their wisdom teeth removed. They are often harder to clean leaving them more susceptible to tooth decay.

Have you been dreaming of a bright white smile? One of the most common dental cosmetic procedures is teeth whitening. As you get older tooth discoloration occurs from constant exposure to certain foods and drinks. This can be done only after they are cleaned and cavity free. Otherwise, the whitening solution can penetrate the inner part of the tooth causing pain and sensitivity to those unhealthy teeth.

The average adult between the ages of 20 and 64 have three or more decayed or missing teeth. Your jaw is constructed to function with 28 teeth, once one goes missing neighboring teeth begin to drift into the vacant space. This makes your good teeth more prone to decay and gum disease. After you lose a tooth, the bone around it begins to shrink over time altering your face leading to that sunken jaw look.

Options To Replace Missing Teeth

  • Dental Implants
  • Bridges
  • Dentures

Dental implants are popular because they look and feel like your natural teeth. They are also the new standard of care. With good oral hygiene, they can last up to 20 years or more. A bridge consists of both a false tooth with the support of two abutment crowns. Think of them as “bridging” the gap left by the missing tooth.

There are several types of dentures; partial, complete, and implant supported. A partial replaces some of your teeth using surrounding teeth as an anchor. A complete denture is removable and replaces all teeth. Implant supported dentures are recommended if you have a healthy jaw for support and would like a more secure fit.

Schedule Your Appointment Today

Bacteria flourish in a dark and wet environment that contains plenty of sugar which is why your mouth is usually their home. Without regular maintenance, they tend to stick around and create plaque on your teeth causing tooth decay and gum disease. Take care of your teeth, you only get one set!

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

Chicago Dentist · dental health · gum disease · Oral Health

Back To School Bling

Wow, can you believe the back-to-school season is already upon us? It feels as if summer started yesterday! Are you ready to send your kids back to school with a shining smile? Preventive dentistry is the best way to protect them.

These next couple of weeks will be busy as you begin to check things off your back to school checklist. _Check-listEdited.pngHave you made one for your children’s dental hygiene? Here are some things to keep in mind:

  •  Schedule their bi-annual dental cleaning
  •  Create an oral hygiene routine
  •  Replace their toothbrush
  •  Shop for healthy foods and snacks
  •  If your child plays sports- protect their teeth with a custom mouth-guard

Besides the importance of regular maintenance, their cleaning appointments can also lead to them missing less school in the future. We will deeply clean your child’s mouth and can prevent further dental issues. Having a set routine helps them get in a good habit and understand the importance of maintaining their oral hygiene. It’s recommended to change your toothbrush every three months or earlier if the bristles are frayed. Healthy foods and snacks can strengthen teeth which may result in fewer cavities. When playing sports, it’s important for your child to wear a mouth-guard to shield their smile from unpredictable hits. Damages can sometimes lead to chips, fractures, and extractions.

Are you up to date with the latest dental trends?

As we know trends come and go, tooth gems have once again gained popularity. It is a small rhinestone glued onto the surface of your tooth.

Risks of Tooth Gems

  • Can cause discoloration on the tooth’s surface.
  • The jewels can wear away enamel, increasing the risk of decay and infection
  • Food can hide behind them promoting the growth of harmful bacteria

Tooth gems are placed by a dentist or yourself and can last up to 6 months. It can be removed or replaced at any time. The longer it’s left on your teeth the more harm it will cause. The procedure only takes about 15 minutes and is 100% reversible.

With tooth gems coming back in style, we can’t help but think, what’s next? Do you remember dental grills? They are made from gold or silver and snap over one or more teeth. They can damage the surface of your teeth by removing enamel and exposing it to bacteria. While removable they must be taken off to eat and brush their teeth. Putting them on immediately after eating can increase plaque build-up.

Another trend to keep an eye out for is getting a tattoo on your teeth, which is also known as #tatooth. They are not permanent and can be replaced at any time. Some negatives are plaque build-up. Also, the chemical used to add tattoo’s is not completely safe. They have found that some inks have pigments used in toner and car paint. The FDA has not authorized any coloring for injection for cosmetic purposes.

Getting permanent ink in your mouth is growing, as people are interested in getting inner lip tattoos. The most requested tattoo is a symbol or a short word. They are known to be one of the most painful areas to get a tattoo. If you want one, you have to hold your lower lip open while being completely still throughout the whole process. Touch-ups are needed frequently because of the high cell turnover in your mouth. _Trends.png

Dangers of Inner Lip Tattoos

  • High risk of infection because your mouth is filled with bacteria
  •  Every touch-up increases risk for infection
  • Foods with high acid content can cause sensitivity.
  • An allergic reaction to the ink can cause painful lumps of scar tissue under the skin, which are difficult to remove.

Before getting any procedure done it’s important to understand how it will affect your health, and if you have any questions give us a call today! Be picky when it comes to trends, you don’t have to follow all of them. We hope you have a great school year!

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

 

Chicago Dentist · dental health · gum disease

What’s In a Kiss?

In 2006 International Kissing Day was established and it’s celebrated on July 6th. In our society, a kiss is a sign of affection or a warm greeting. Did you know a single kiss can spread up to 80 million bacteria?

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We are not born with the bacteria that cause cavities. Studies have proven that parents often infect their child before 2. Once your child becomes exposed they are prone to cavities in baby and permanent teeth. In fact, babies can also begin to develop them before their first tooth erupts!

Tooth decay is a disease known as dental caries. It is caused by specific germs and is easily spread throughout families by sharing a cup, utensils, or toothbrushes, and lasts a lifetime. Did you know it’s more common for a child to have cavities than any other chronic illness? Bacteria loves sugar and attacks the structure of teeth by diminishing calcium. It also creates plaque which builds even more enamel-eroding acid.

 Can tooth decay be spotted early?

Early tooth decay can be hard to see. A sign is a white strip along the gum line at the base of the teeth. During the early stages, you might be able to see brown spots on the teeth, and gums are red and inflamed. When more advanced, the spots are blackened.

If you have had your fair share of troubles with your teeth, it’s important to take precautions when it comes to your child’s dental care. It’s recommended to bring your child to the dentist six months after the first tooth erupts or by their first birthday. The best way to limit cavities is to brush and floss with your kids daily. Setting the example, helps create and reinforce these healthy habits.

 Tips for keeping decay away from your children:

  • Wipe down your baby’s gums with a washcloth after feedings, even if the first tooth has not erupted.
  • Start brushing with fluoride-free toothpaste as the first tooth erupts.
  • When your child is two or three years old, begin using toothpaste with a small amount of fluoride, and begin flossing when two teeth are touching.

 What can happen to untreated cavities?

Cavities don’t go away by themselves. If you ignore a cavity, it continues to grow. They are small holes in your teeth that will become wider and deeper making your teeth more fragile, increasing the risk to crack. If left untreated, the cavity will next reach your tooth’s nerves, which is likely to cause severe pain. Depending on your situation, your tooth will either need a root canal or require extraction. If your tooth is infected you will need antibiotics along with cavity treatment.

stages of perio.pngWhat is Gum Disease?

Gum disease is an infection at your gum line which may result in damaged jaw bone. There are three different stages: gingivitis, periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. Gum disease is caused by bacteria and plaque. If not removed it hardens and turns into tartar while plaque continues to form more build up. The only way for it to be removed is by visiting your dentist for a professional cleaning.

 Warning Signs of Gum Disease

  •  Bleeding gums while brushing or flossing
  •  Gums that are pulled away from teeth- making teeth look longer
  •  Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • Swollen, red, or tender gums
  •  Bad breath

 What happens if I don’t treat my Periodontitis?

 The first stage of gum disease might be easy to miss, but if left untreated it will result in larger problems. If you notice any of the warning signs or think you may have gum disease contact us today. Lack of treatment results in tender gums, receding gums, sensitive teeth, loose teeth, and eventually leads to tooth loss. Let’s prevent that together!

 Have you ever wondered why we kiss with our eyes closed? Maybe it’s because when oral care wasn’t popular nobody wanted to see others teeth up close… Just kidding! But because of dental advancements, it’s easy to keep your smile in tip-top shape. Protect you and your family from bacteria and tooth decay by requesting your appointment today!

 

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist · gum disease · Uncategorized

Navigating the Holiday Table

Can you believe it; the holiday season is already here! It’s time to start digging out family recipes, decorations, and all those holiday goodies buried in your closet. Schedules are everywhere from family gatherings to local festivities. Peppermint, gingerbread, and pumpkin are holiday classics! What is your favorite holiday dish? We all know that sugary foods and drinks may rot our teeth, but most don’t know what foods can be beneficial.  So here’s a list of those that might actually surprise you.

  • Crunchy Fruits and Vegetables
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Okra
  • Apples
  • Pumpkin has magnesium which takes care of your enamel. Pumpkin seeds have iron and help keep your tongue healthy.

 

  • Cheese and Dairy
  • Plain yogurt
  • Cheese has a lot of protein and calcium which is good for enamel.

 

  • Seafood
  • Salmon
  • Mackerel
  • Eel
  • Tuna
  • Most seafood has fluoride.

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Fun Facts

  • Nuts have calcium along with phosphorous that helps strengthens enamel.
  • High fiber triggers your flow of saliva.
  • Whole grains have B vitamins and iron, keeping your gums in tip-top shape!
  • Dark chocolate has polyphenols which are a natural chemical that limits bacteria.

Sources: Colgate, Oral-B, and Medical Daily

Healthy Holidays Recipe

 Whole- Wheat Pumpkin Bread

Gingerbread Cookies

Triple Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Yes, there are health benefits to these foods and drinks but it’s important to remember: MODERATION IS KEY! So enjoy your favorite holiday foods and indulge in a bit of guilty pleasure.

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Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

 

gum disease · Oral Health

4 Risk Factors of Gum Disease to Discuss with Your Dentist

Have you ever had something caught in your teeth for days? It’s likely because it was lodged deep between a tooth and your gums. That gum tissue is what keeps our chompers in place. There are three stages of gum disease and all are treatable.

The mild form of gum disease is Gingivitis. This is where plaque and other byproducts irrGum Disease Sighitate the gums. It makes them swollen, tender, and more likely to bleed. Periodontitis is stage two. The gum tissue starts deteriorating as it detaches from the teeth forming pockets around the roots. This leaves teeth exposed and more susceptible to decay. Finally, Advanced Periodontitis can set in. Tooth pockets get deeper as the severe gum recession leads to bone loss causing loose teeth.

Common Risk Factors of Periodontal Disease

  • Genetics – it’s hereditary and some of us are just unlucky! While you may be more susceptible to periodontitis, having a good oral hygiene routine with regular dental visits can help your smile stay healthy. Talk to us about finding the right balance for your needs.
  • Health – underlying medical conditions like diabetes and Crohn’s disease, as well as lowered immunity from illnesses and treatments often affect gum tissue. Medications, hormonal changes and obesity are also culprits and should be discussed.
  • Bad Habits – chewing on ice, not brushing or flossing daily and using tobacco are the most common behavior changes we encourage you to ditch. However, substance abuse and a diet lacking in vitamin C will also impact your smile.
  • Stress – it’s inevitable. But keep an eye on exactly how much it’s weighing you down. High levels or chronic stress can lead to poor hygiene habits. Anxiety can also lower your immune system from effectively fighting off bacteria that causes gingivitis (stage 1).

When to Seek HelpCapture

Common red flags of gum disease include:

  • Bleeding gums
  • Swollen or tender gums
  • Gums look bright red
  • Teeth wiggle

There’s no home remedy to cure gum disease. Only professional treatment can help, so call and schedule an exam today (773) 586-5522

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

dental health · gum disease · Oral Health

Do You Have a Dental Disorder?

The range of possible dental disorders is wide and many and some are more easily recognized than others. It could be a bit perplexing to consider you may have a dental disorder without realizing it, but it’s actually more common than you might think. Some disorders have obvious symptoms that may have you running to our office. Others can be more subtle. Do you feel tired, easily irritable, or have difficulty focusing? Do you have facial soreness or pain? Surprisingly, these may be the result of a dental disorder. Our goal is to educate our patients on common and uncommon symptoms that may be a sign to visit our office and receive the required care to remedy these conditions.

A dental disorder is a disruption of your body’s natural process relating to your oral health. Despite its origins, it is important to understand symptoms may be experienced elsewhere in the body. For this reason, many suffer from ailments they don’t consider relevant to tell their dentist. However, as we are a medical provider we encourage you to share things that may not seem related – you never know! Here are a few to keep on the lookout, so you can better identify signs should something be amiss.

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Redness and swelling of the gums may indicate the presence of gingivitis, or early-stage gum disease. Left untreated, it can progress into full blown periodontitis that can threaten your smile and even cause tooth loss. Bleeding from the gums, tooth mobility, and soreness are all signs of periodontitis and should be checked.

Simple bad breath, or halitosis, is very common among adults and teens. While it usually isn’t cause for too much concern, we understand it can weigh on your self-esteem. We care about your health and happiness, and would love to work with you to address the root of the issue. Restoring healthy smiles is what we do; restoring confidence is a happy side effect.

Additionally, a dry mouth may not seem like a dire situation. However, if your mouth constantly feels dry it can lead to an increased risk of tooth decay. Saliva plays an important role in ridding your mouth of bacteria, it also aids in digestion meaning it can evolve into issues that transcend the health of your smile.

Sleep apnea is another condition that may seem unrelated to your dental health. Leading to excessive tiredness and other signs of exhaustion, sleep apnea threatens your overall health when you don’t receive adequate quality sleep over long periods of time. Your sleeping habits may not seem relevant to tell your dentist, but there is a lot we can do to completely resolve the situation!

Dentist Looking Glass Teeth

While scary to confront, oral growths are a condition that can emerge as serious. It is possible for oral growths to be completely benign and harmless, but in other cases they can be the beginning stages of cancer. For this reason it’s important a medical professional diagnose and treat the growths accordingly. Even if you are certain it’s harmless (for example, perhaps you suffered trauma to the face that injured your mouth), it’s still worth an appointment to ensure you’re not at an increased risk for infection or other potential issues.

TMD (Temporomandibular Disorder) is a dysfunction of the TMJ – a joint located in your jaw bone. TMD is sometimes known as “imposter syndrome” because it can mimic so many conditions, and it can be difficult to relate it back to a dental disorder. It can lead to pain in the jaws, cracking or popping sounds, migraines, numbness in the fingers and toes, lock jaw, or many other related issues. A common problem with TMD is that, in the event your symptoms include non-dental related pain such as migraines or numb extremities, patients may not tell their dentist (without realizing how closely related it may be) and find themselves unable to diagnose the problem and suffer with the consequences long-term.

We understand some conditions may seem complex. Rest assured we are here to work with you to find a solution to your unique needs. If you feel one or more of these conditions may apply to you or a family member, call our office to begin seeking relief today. We are here for you.

 

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

gum disease

Keep Calm and Floss On

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On August 2nd, this New York Times article was published and caused quite a bit of controversy in both the dental community and with the general public. While it is not conclusive in its findings, the overarching claim is that flossing may not be as beneficial as once thought. As dental professionals, we take very seriously the responsibility we have ensuring our patients receive the best possible education and care regarding the health of their smiles. For this reason, we feel compelled to express our disagreement with the suggestion that flossing may be overrated, and why that’s a harmful position to propagate.

Let’s first look at the article, which uses a lot of language such as:

  • “…flossing may be
  • “…most of the current evidence fell short…”
  • “That flossing has the same benefit is a hunch that has never been proved.”
  • “…there is some mediocre evidence that flossing does reduce bloody gums and inflammation known asgingivitis.”

There is a stark difference between something ‘not having been proved’ and something being ‘disproved’. Please know that there is no evidence remotely close to suggesting the latter. In fact whether the evidence is “mediocre” or not, the only evidence the article does mention (quoted above) is in favor of flossing. A lack of ability to prove something is not cause to discourage an entire population from participating in a highly beneficial component of their health care. This is particularly true because evidence is acquired by conducting large-scale studies, which are extremely costly. It would hardly be economical to spend the research funding to prove something we already have no doubt offers a variety of benefit for your oral and overall health.

We do not agree with the article’s brash call to action, or more accurately, call to inaction, and we fear how this may increase the number of people inflicted with preventable damage to their smile. Looking again at the line “…there is some mediocre evidence that flossing does reduce bloody gums and inflammation known as gingivitis.” Gingivitis is the first stage in periodontal disease – the very condition flossing aims to combat. To reduce gingivitis is to reduce your chances of progressing into advanced gum disease, a condition more than half of Americans already suffer from (CDC).

It is unfortunate the scale of damage this article has the potential to incite; too many readers will take this “lack of evidence” as being evidence to the contrary, and feel it gives them permission to neglect a very essential part of their oral health care.

We can only do our best to keep our patients like you educated and on the path to a lifelong happy and healthy smile – a path that certainly includes consistent flossing.

CDC: “Periodontal Disease.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 10 Mar. 2015. Web.

Garfield Ridge Dentistry
6508 West Archer Avenue, Suite 5
Chicago, IL 60638 (map)
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist · dental health · gum disease · Office News · Oral Health · Uncategorized

Deep Cleaning: What it means to you

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You’re a good person – you pay your taxes, pick up litter, and make it to the dentist every 6 months. Now you’re being told you may need a deep cleaning…but don’t you clean your teeth every day? And isn’t a deep cleaning what the dentist always does? Not quite, although we know it can sometimes feel that way.

A regular dental cleaning is what you are accustomed to receiving every 6 months. The intention of this visit to the dentist is to maintain your healthy gums and give your teeth a little extra attention when it comes to matters of plaque and tartar, which can be difficult to remove fully with a toothbrush and floss alone. The odds are that if you are brushing and flossing every day, and taking any other steps recommended by your doctor, a regular dental cleaning is the perfect addition to your regular care that will keep your smile happy and healthy.

Deep cleaning, a necessity?

A deep cleaning, on the other hand, is what becomes necessary when the health of your teeth and gums become jeopardized by gum disease (or ‘periodontitis’). To put it in perspective, your gums are supposed to have tight and healthy seals around your teeth to protect them and keep them firmly in place. A standard part of your regular cleaning is your doctor using a diagnostic tool called a ‘periodontal probe’ to ensure this is the case; the probe is used to measure the depth of the space between your gums and teeth. Typically 1-3mm is considered normal, and there should be very little or no bleeding at all. Upwards of 4mm is a sign that you are developing ‘pockets’, which are a space between the teeth and gums that becomes prime breeding ground for bacteria and tartar buildup. Plaque that is not brushed and flossed away left on the teeth for more than 24 hours can become tartar, which only your dentist can remove. Left unattended, these pockets can deepen and compromise the tooth and the surrounding bone structure. If the dentist uses the probe and measures 4mm or more, and/or there is significant bleeding and signs of inflammation, then a deep cleaning will be scheduled to help you get your smile back on track.

Deep cleaning is not a scary process.

Oftentimes, your dentist will break the cleaning into two separate visits to most effectively treat your mouth, this is especially important if your entire mouth needs attention so that you’ll be numbed in only smaller sections of your mouth each time, making for a completely comfortable process and quick recovery. The most common forms of treatment are ‘scaling’ and ‘root planing’. The process of scaling involves using a professional tool to remove plaque and tartar from both the surface of the teeth, and the pocket area that has been created between your teeth and gums. A scaling instrument, on the other hand, removes plaque and tartar from the surface of the root of your teeth, which is below the gum line and not visible. These tools are the only thing that can removed built up plaque, as even floss cannot reach far into deepened pockets. The good news is they do a wonderful job of cleaning up any tartar that has built up beneath the visible surface.

Periodontitis is a progressive disease, and left unattended can turn into a much more serious problem. Fortunately, the treatment is typically straight forward and as long as you follow the doctor’s aftercare instructions, the bacteria should be reduced to manageable levels and your gums should return to normal and lose any signs of redness. If you are feeling pain or sensitivity in your teeth, have red and/or puffy gums, or are experiencing bleeding during normal brushing and flossing – call us. The sooner periodontitis is identified the easier it is to treat and the less expensive it is for you, if you have any concerns about your oral health just remember that a professional evaluation is never harmful and may offer you some great information.

DR. IZZY NAEM

Garfield Ridge Dentistry
6508 West Archer Avenue, Suite 5
Chicago, IL 60638 (map)
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Dental Edge

4941 N. Kedzie

Chicago, IL 60625 (map)
Phone: (773) 681-0668