Chicago Dentist · Cosmetic Dentistry · Oral Health

Season To Smile

Time flies. We’re almost halfway through 2018. Which also means it’s the start of graduation and wedding seasons. How confident are you with your smile? It doesn’t matter if your big day is in weeks or months there are steps to take now.

Have you ever thought about getting a smile makeover? The first thing someone notices about you is your smile. It can be as complex as restoring missing teeth, or as simple as correcting uneven, chipped, or cracked teeth. Teeth whitening is one of the most popular cosmetic procedures and can be done in a single visit.

Cosmetic dentistry is generally the new kid on the block. With advancements in technology, cosmetic dentistry came to life in the 20th century. The focus is to create beautiful natural looking smiles.

What is a smile makeover and what can it do for me?

A smile makeover improves the appearance of your smile using one or more cosmetic procedures. It’s completely customized for you and the smile you desire! If you need a quick fix, bonding might be for you. Bonding is a tooth-colored composite resin to fix chips, fractures or small gaps. It can even be used to make your teeth appear longer.

Reality

Veneers are another option. Custom made and placed over your crooked, discolored, or chipped front teeth, they are thin and durable to give you a more aesthetic smile. Usually, it will take a couple visits to complete and lasts anywhere from 10 to 20 years, fixing multiple issues with a single procedure.

Do you have missing teeth?

Dental implants could be your best option for a complete smile. Implants are metal posts that fuse with your jawbone to help avoid that sunken jaw look. After they are in place a crown is added on top. Implants look and feel like natural teeth. While this procedure can only be done if you have healthy gums and enough bone for support, we can help with this. They are permanent and it’s important to maintain good oral habits to preserve them.

Looking for a straighter smile?

If your teeth are crowded, misaligned, or you have an overbite or underbite orthodontics may be the best route for an aesthetic smile. You have a few different options, traditional metal braces, Invisalign or Clear Correct. Invisalign and clear correct are clear removable aligners that straighten your teeth. Unlike traditional braces, these clear trays are removed while you eat and brush your teeth! Don’t let your age discourage you from getting your perfect smile! We offer adult orthodontics.

What can help discolored teeth?

Does the color of your teeth make you self-conscious when smiling for photos? The food and drinks you consume may be the reason your teeth aren’t sparkling white. Coffee, tea, berries, and sweets are just some examples of what can stain your teeth. Did you know whitening is the most requested procedures in cosmetic dentistry? It can be done at home or in our office and can possibly make your smile up to 8 shades brighter!

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You deserve to have the self confidence to share your smile big on your special day! Don’t over think what you should or shouldn’t do, give us a call or request an appointment online and let’s discuss your best smile options together.

 

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

Chicago Dentist · Oral Health · Preventitive

How Green Is Your Dental Routine?

 Go green for Earth Day! In 1970, 20 million Americans rallied in streets, parks, and auditoriums for a sustainable environment. Later Gaylord Nelson, a Wisconsin Senator created Earth Day. After the first Earth Day, the United States Environmental Protection Agency was created. Every April 22nd Earth Day is celebrated worldwide.

We’re focused on global warming and clean energy. Everything we do, from brushing our teeth to eating and driving all contributes to polluting the environment. Did you know that toothbrushes are plastic and nylon which can’t be recycled? When you throw your toothbrush away it sits in our landfill forever. Every year 50 million pounds of toothbrushes get added to our landfill and plastic doesn’t biodegrade because it’s not in nature’s food chain.

Landfill.pngA completely plastic-free dental routine might not be possible, but small changes can make a big difference. For instance, there are toothbrushes made of bamboo or wood. The wooden toothbrush bristles are made from pig hair which is recyclable and will reduce the amount of plastic in landfills. A shocking one billion toothbrushes get thrown away yearly in the US.

Change isn’t easy. If you aren’t ready to make the change to pig hair bristles then stick to your regular toothbrush. And when it’s time to get rid of it and get a new one, keep it and reuse it for household cleaning! Toothbrushes are great for cleaning bathroom tiles, toilets, computer keyboards, jewelry, and even shoes.

Bamboo and wood toothbrushes aren’t your only options for a healthy smile and environment. There are plastic toothbrushes made from recycled materials such as yogurt containers and the bristles are a new plant-based plastic . There are also compostable cornstarch toothbrushes that won’t clog landfills.

Floss is wax covered nylon and comes in a container that has metal. This means that floss and it’s container are not recyclable. Good news, there is plastic free and refillable floss! Refillable floss is sold in a glass container with a protective label which protects the container from dropping. The bundle of floss comes in a clear compostable bag and it also has a plastic-free spool. It is completely made from silk and coated with vegetable-based wax.

Toothbrush Tip

Show your gums some love! Don’t brush with all your strength, it’s not good for your gums or your toothbrush! Every time you brush your teeth it affects your toothbrush. The harder you brush your teeth the quicker you will need to replace your toothbrush. Protect your gums and the lifespan of your toothbrush!

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.pngThese are the three R’s when protecting the environment. Do you leave the water running while brushing? If so try filling a small glass and set it in reaching distance to rinse after brushing. Another tip is don’t leave your electric toothbrush plugged in all day every day. The average toothbrush lasts up to several weeks. Unplug!

Ready, Set, Go Green!

Are you ready to make the change to help save our environment? We know this is a lot of information at once, and it’s okay to take small steps and make one change at a time. It’s as simple as sharing with your family and friends about the environment and how they can help sustain it too!

Remember to brush twice a day for two minutes and floss daily! We hope you have a Happy Earth Day!

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

Chicago Dentist · Cosmetic Dentistry · General · Oral Health · Uncategorized

3 Ways Oral Health Influences Your Body: Heart Disease, Diabetes, Pregnancy

Happy 2018! New Year’s resolutions are not as popular as they once were, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make changes to your everyday life. Now is always the right time!  Did you know oral health affects your overall health?  It’s important to brush and floss daily along with dental check-ups every 6 months. Poor oral habits can lead to gum disease because your mouth is swarming with bacteria. And gum disease is linked to heart diseases, diabetes, and pregnancy. Oral health is connected to your total health.

Heart Disease

Are you wondering how your oral health relates to your heart? Everyday brushing and flossing manages the bacteria levels in your mouth.  Without daily cleaning, bacteria is free to flow into your bloodstream and can travel to your arteries.  Arteries are blood vessels that distribute oxygen from your heart to your body. This can lead to atherosclerosis where plaque builds up on the inner layers of your arteries. This can cause clots that can block blood flow through your body.  Increasing the likelihood of suffering a heart attack or stroke.

Source: American Heart Association

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Diabetes

Did you know you are 3 to 4 times more likely to have gum disease after being diagnosed with diabetes?  Diabetes affects how your body processes sugar and leaving you at a higher risk for gum disease. It can also make your blood sugar level constantly increase. Meaning your body has a harder time fighting the bacteria attacking your gums. People receiving gum disease treatment along with antibiotics showed improvements with their blood sugar levels. Be sure to keep us updated on your health history and medication lists.

Source: American Diabetes Association

Pregnancy

Pregnancy is no excuse to slack on your oral care. Hormone levels are uncontrollable it can cause your gums to bleed, swell, and absorb food. This leads to pregnancy gingivitis.  Another thing to look out for is pregnancy tumors. While harmless, they start to appear during your second trimester between your teeth. If you begin to feel pain or irritation your dentist can have them removed. Most of the time they disappear after your child is born.

A common side effect of pregnancy is morning sickness which can be alarming for your teeth. The acid from your stomach can lead to tooth decay. We recommended gargling with baking soda and water after an episode of morning sickness before brushing your teeth. Dental appointments and procedures are encouraged during pregnancy to help prevent gum disease. It is optimal to have dental work done during your second trimester because the developments of your fetal organs are complete and the risks of side effects are lower.  Once you are in the third trimester it may be harder for you to lay on your back for a long period of time.

Source: American Pregnancy Association

Living a healthy lifestyle can seem overwhelming but remember to make small strides daily. Here are five healthy habits for a happy life.

  • Brush your teeth twice daily
  • Floss once a day
  • Preventive health care screening, at least once every six months
  • Smile and Laugh
  • Physical Activity
  • Adequate sleep

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Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist · gum disease · Uncategorized

Navigating the Holiday Table

Can you believe it; the holiday season is already here! It’s time to start digging out family recipes, decorations, and all those holiday goodies buried in your closet. Schedules are everywhere from family gatherings to local festivities. Peppermint, gingerbread, and pumpkin are holiday classics! What is your favorite holiday dish? We all know that sugary foods and drinks may rot our teeth, but most don’t know what foods can be beneficial.  So here’s a list of those that might actually surprise you.

  • Crunchy Fruits and Vegetables
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Okra
  • Apples
  • Pumpkin has magnesium which takes care of your enamel. Pumpkin seeds have iron and help keep your tongue healthy.

 

  • Cheese and Dairy
  • Plain yogurt
  • Cheese has a lot of protein and calcium which is good for enamel.

 

  • Seafood
  • Salmon
  • Mackerel
  • Eel
  • Tuna
  • Most seafood has fluoride.

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Fun Facts

  • Nuts have calcium along with phosphorous that helps strengthens enamel.
  • High fiber triggers your flow of saliva.
  • Whole grains have B vitamins and iron, keeping your gums in tip-top shape!
  • Dark chocolate has polyphenols which are a natural chemical that limits bacteria.

Sources: Colgate, Oral-B, and Medical Daily

Healthy Holidays Recipe

 Whole- Wheat Pumpkin Bread

Gingerbread Cookies

Triple Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Yes, there are health benefits to these foods and drinks but it’s important to remember: MODERATION IS KEY! So enjoy your favorite holiday foods and indulge in a bit of guilty pleasure.

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Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

 

Chicago Dentist · dental health · General · Uncategorized

Modern vs Historical Dental Practices

 

Did you know barbers were the go-to people for concerns about your teeth? In the past, they not only groomed your face but also extracted and whitened your teeth. It wasn’t until 1840 that the first college Baltimore College of Dental Surgery opened. Today, the United States has over 60 schools and dentistry is considered a specialized practice. Let’s take a look back and see how modern dentistry came to be.

Toothbrushes, Toothpaste, and Floss

  • In ancient times chew sticks were used to help keep the mouth clean, they believed that it would get rid of unwanted particles.
  • The first toothbrush was made in China in 1498, handles were made from animal bones or bamboo, and the bristles came from the back of a pigs neck.
  • In 1824 soap was put into toothpaste and in the 1850s chalk was added.

Nowadays toothbrushes are available in different sizes, shapes, and colors. The handles are plastic and the bristles are made of nylon. Which is a long way from bones and bristles!

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In 1873, Colgate produced the first toothpaste in a jar and by the 1890’s toothpaste was packaged in tubes. Imagine dipping your toothbrush into a jar. Now imagine everyone in your house dipping their toothbrush into that same jar. Doesn’t it just make you appreciate the growth in this field?

Source: Colgate

In 1815 silk thread was recommended for cleaning in between teeth and by the 1940’s nylon became the standard.

Source: Oral-B

Modern Dental Techniques

Modernized dentistry has greatly reduced the risk for infections and implants, crowns, and bridges, are now common cosmetic procedures.  Modern crowns are made of composite, porcelain, and metals. They strengthen damaged teeth and can improve your tooth’s overall shape. Bridges are used to fill the tooth gaps and are secured with a neighboring crown on each side.

Dental implants are now the standard of care for missing teeth. These titanium roots are placed into your jawbone and fuse over time. Implants can anchor crowns, bridges, and dentures. They’ve gained popularity as they look and feel natural like your own teeth.

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Crowns/Bridges

  • Crowns were made of human teeth, gold, ivory, and bone.
  • Bridges were gold and a sign of wealth.

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Implants

  • Whole tooth implants were from deceased lower class citizens, slaves or animals, and infections were common.
  • Seashells, sculpted bamboo, and copper were also used.
  • Iron pins supported a gold tooth to showcase your riches.

Do you consider using people’s teeth to replace yours as resourceful or gross?

In the 1970’s orthodontists said goodbye to headgear and wiring and hello to stainless steel brackets. To fix your bite hooks are placed in your mouth and you will get a pack of rubber bands, slowly adjusting your jaw position with tension over many months.

Giving thanks to new technology we have another option called Invisalign. Packaged as a set of clear plastic aligners, every two weeks you change the tray. There are slight changes to each aligner and your teeth will slowly adjust into the perfect smile of your dreams. Besides not having metal in your mouth, Invisalign is taken out before every meal and snack. Is remembering to take them on and off too much of a hassle?

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Orthodontics

  • One of the first forms of teeth straightening had animal intestines as cords and it wrapped around each individual tooth.
  • Gold bands were also used and preferred because they didn’t rust. Silver was also used and wasn’t as expensive.
  • Ivory and wood were also used.

Can you believe that current teeth whitening procedures were accidentally discovered? In the past, peroxide was used to help strengthen patient’s gums but they got whiter teeth. Today teeth whitening can be done in office or with a take-home whitening kit from your dentist.

Whitening

  • Ancient Romans used human urine because the ammonia is an amazing stain remover.
  • Ancient Egyptians used ground pumice stone and white vinegar to make a whitening paste.
  • Barbers could file your teeth down and spread acid on them to help you have a whiter smile.

Putting someone else’s teeth to replace yours is unheard of today because of our modern resources and technologies. Today dentistry is a specialized practice and after earning a dental degree, dentists are required to annually continue their education. Reflecting back to where dentistry once was, we can remember where this field started and appreciate its success.

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

 

Chicago Dentist · Oral Surgery

Oral Surgery Post Treatment Home Care

Guy Tooth Pain

Post treatment care is essential for the health and longevity of your teeth and mouth after your oral surgery. Luckily, post treatment care is not complicated.  It is normal to feel tenderness at the site of the surgery and in the jaw for a few days after your oral surgery. This discomfort is temporary and usually responds well to pain medications. Following our simple recommended guidelines post-treatment will ensure a smooth and successful recovery and reduce the tenderness as you heal.

After Oral Surgery Healing Guidelines

  • Immediately following the procedure, avoid chewing and drinking hot liquids until the numbness wears off. This prevents damage to the treated tooth and the soft tissues of your mouth.
  • Control discomfort by taking your prescribed pain medication. If antibiotics are prescribed, take as directed even after symptoms subside.
  • Following certain procedures, a temporary filling may be placed between appointments to protect the tooth. Occasionally, a small piece will wear away or break off. However, if the entire filling falls out, please notify our office to schedule a replacement.
  • Your surgery site my feel tender for some time after treatment. If you have moderate pain or pressure lasting more than a few days, contact us immediately.

shutterstock_215264146Oral surgery is often only the first step to returning your mouth to full capacity. Follow-up procedures and exams are sometimes necessary to ensure life-long function. Schedule an appointment with us for your follow-up as soon as possible.  After surgery, continue practicing proper oral hygiene, including brushing and flossing with regular dental visits. Call today if you have questions regarding your surgery, or post treatment care.

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist

Dental X-Rays and Your Health

X-rays, otherwise known as dental radiographs, are a staple of quality dental care. While x-rays bring undeniable advantages when it comes to identifying and diagnosing potential health issues, some may harbor reservations regarding the risks of exposure to radiation.  Fortunately we can ease those concerns and serve as a resource for understanding radiography, so you can feel confident receiving excellent care.

Why Do I Need Dental X-Rays

X-rays are an essential tool in the dental community (and medical community at large) as they provide valuable insights that we would not otherwise be able to access with visual inspection alone. Our team, with the help of x-rays, is able to see between, inside, and under your teeth. In doing so, we have the ability to check a variety of important health factors. This includes the presence of cavities, the health of your tooth roots, the bone structure surrounding the tooth, the status of developing teeth, the health of your jaw bone, and many more conditions that we would not otherwise be able to monitor. X-rays are instrumental when there is a known issue; with them, we are better able to understand the full scope of the situation and design an appropriate treatment plan for the beauty and health of your smile.

Radiation Exposure from X-Rays

Radiography technology has come a long way, and your exposure to radiation is negligible amounts in terms of risk – in fact, the risk you assume by forgoing x-rays can create long-term damage that could otherwise have been identified and treated. We understand some patients have concerns about radiation exposure, and it’s important to understand we are all consistently exposed to radiation each and every day. It’s high levels of exposure that are the true cause for concern. Our x-ray machines operate on a micro-scale that simply don’t compare. We assure you receiving x-rays is one of the single most beneficial processes capable of saving your health by identifying small problems before they progress into serious conditions.

If you have any unaddressed concerns, in regards to x-rays or other dental procedures, our knowledgeable staff is happy to share answers with you. We want you to feel relaxed in our office, and confident that you are receiving the best care possible!

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist

What Causes Bad Breath?

We’ve probably all known someone with bad breath. It can be uncomfortable to engage in discussion with someone whose breath smells downright foul. It’s also a sensitive topic to broach, as well as being a very common concern – after all, each year Americans spend an estimated $3 billion dollars on breath freshening products. Halitosis, more commonly known as bad breath, is clearly a concern well felt amongst adults – but what is the cause?

Symptoms and Sources of Bad Breath

There are several sources of bad breath, including diet and dry mouth – both boil down to the presence of bacteria. The most common odor-causing bacteria are located on the tongue, particularly toward the back where they tend to be undisturbed. If neglected during cleaning, it’s a prime breeding ground for bacteria to feed on leftover food particles, dead skin cells, and mucus. In addition to the tongue, less common offenders include build-up between the teeth and below the gum line, increasing the bad odor. In addition to inconsistent oral care, there are other common reasons for mild cases of bad breath.

Most of us are familiar with the term ‘morning breath’ – a common reference to oral odor experienced in the early hours after waking up. Morning breath can be attributed to a dry mouth, as the result of inactivity during the night fueling bacteria production. Saliva is a natural defense against these offenders, and saliva production slows down the longer the mouth is inactive. If you suffer from chronic dry mouth, the same principles apply whether it’s morning or not. Additionally, food particles (especially sugars) remaining in the mouth encourage bacteria growth. All of this adds up to an increasingly unpleasant and embarrassing odor when you are speaking and breathing.

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath

When it comes to solutions, anything not addressing the presence of bacteria is a purely cosmetic fix. This includes gum, mints, and similar – sorry! The solutions very much depend on the specific source, and may be as easy as improving your general oral hygiene routine, or it could require a deep cleaning by a dental professional. A more serious cause, and subsequent solution, may be decay present in the mouth that requires removal. No matter the case, vigilant oral care will always be helpful in terms of avoiding unpleasant breath!

Bad breath, while harmless, can be an indicator your oral care habits are insufficient. If you are concerned about your breath, try brushing and flossing more thoroughly to remove any lingering bacteria. If the problem persists, contact us for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan!

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist

How the Holidays Affect Your Teeth

The holidays are infamous for being diet-breakers, but let’s not forget the effect excessive sweets can have on your oral health! Don’t worry, we aren’t going to convince you to pass on pecan pie or skip the cider; however, it is important to continue practicing healthy habits, even with some well-deserved indulgences peppered into your seasonal celebrations. Sugar affects everyone’s teeth, no matter how old. Younger children’s smiles are still in the process of development, which means they need added care throughout the growing stages.

The Start of Gum Disease and Cavities

To better understand why it’s important to monitor sugar consumption, we must first address the development of gum disease and cavities. When you eat normally throughout the day, food particles and bacteria collect in your mouth and on your teeth. As you brush and floss, these particles and bacteria are removed with no harm done. However, the presence of sugar fuels the bacteria, which creates enamel-destroying acid; left untreated, the acids corrode a hole in the tooth that deepens over time. Additionally, infection can occur in the gum tissues and lead to swelling, bleeding, and pain. It’s important to limit the bacteria’s opportunity to spread by practicing consistent oral care, and keep your mouth free of disease and infection.

Dental Decay in Children

When teeth are still in development, the story can be a bit different. The above still applies, but the stakes are higher during the formative years of cutting teeth. It isn’t uncommon to hear “oh, they’re just baby teeth”, but that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Child tooth decay is a rampant condition and, although completely preventable, is five times as common as asthma. It’s entirely possible for the infection to spread beneath the gum line, and compromise the healthy adult teeth growing below. Until children are a certain age, it’s imperative for parents to teach sustainable healthy habits. Fortunately, we have a tip or two for the whole family!

When it comes to limiting sugar intake, but also being practical enough to live a little (especially during the holidays!) we stress that it’s actually the timing of sugar consumption that affects dental health more than the quantity consumed. That means less sweets eaten throughout longer periods of the day can actually harm your teeth more than a large serving of dessert eaten at once. Additionally, serving sweets along with the meal can also prevent over-exposure, as they are less likely to sit on the teeth for extended periods of time. Bearing these facts in mind, we suggest instead of leaving sweets all over the house, limit consumption until meal time, and then allow yourselves and the kids to enjoy your share of holiday confections!

 

Floss and Company
7110 West Archer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60638
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Chicago Dentist · dental health · gum disease · Office News · Oral Health · Uncategorized

Deep Cleaning: What it means to you

General-Title

You’re a good person – you pay your taxes, pick up litter, and make it to the dentist every 6 months. Now you’re being told you may need a deep cleaning…but don’t you clean your teeth every day? And isn’t a deep cleaning what the dentist always does? Not quite, although we know it can sometimes feel that way.

A regular dental cleaning is what you are accustomed to receiving every 6 months. The intention of this visit to the dentist is to maintain your healthy gums and give your teeth a little extra attention when it comes to matters of plaque and tartar, which can be difficult to remove fully with a toothbrush and floss alone. The odds are that if you are brushing and flossing every day, and taking any other steps recommended by your doctor, a regular dental cleaning is the perfect addition to your regular care that will keep your smile happy and healthy.

Deep cleaning, a necessity?

A deep cleaning, on the other hand, is what becomes necessary when the health of your teeth and gums become jeopardized by gum disease (or ‘periodontitis’). To put it in perspective, your gums are supposed to have tight and healthy seals around your teeth to protect them and keep them firmly in place. A standard part of your regular cleaning is your doctor using a diagnostic tool called a ‘periodontal probe’ to ensure this is the case; the probe is used to measure the depth of the space between your gums and teeth. Typically 1-3mm is considered normal, and there should be very little or no bleeding at all. Upwards of 4mm is a sign that you are developing ‘pockets’, which are a space between the teeth and gums that becomes prime breeding ground for bacteria and tartar buildup. Plaque that is not brushed and flossed away left on the teeth for more than 24 hours can become tartar, which only your dentist can remove. Left unattended, these pockets can deepen and compromise the tooth and the surrounding bone structure. If the dentist uses the probe and measures 4mm or more, and/or there is significant bleeding and signs of inflammation, then a deep cleaning will be scheduled to help you get your smile back on track.

Deep cleaning is not a scary process.

Oftentimes, your dentist will break the cleaning into two separate visits to most effectively treat your mouth, this is especially important if your entire mouth needs attention so that you’ll be numbed in only smaller sections of your mouth each time, making for a completely comfortable process and quick recovery. The most common forms of treatment are ‘scaling’ and ‘root planing’. The process of scaling involves using a professional tool to remove plaque and tartar from both the surface of the teeth, and the pocket area that has been created between your teeth and gums. A scaling instrument, on the other hand, removes plaque and tartar from the surface of the root of your teeth, which is below the gum line and not visible. These tools are the only thing that can removed built up plaque, as even floss cannot reach far into deepened pockets. The good news is they do a wonderful job of cleaning up any tartar that has built up beneath the visible surface.

Periodontitis is a progressive disease, and left unattended can turn into a much more serious problem. Fortunately, the treatment is typically straight forward and as long as you follow the doctor’s aftercare instructions, the bacteria should be reduced to manageable levels and your gums should return to normal and lose any signs of redness. If you are feeling pain or sensitivity in your teeth, have red and/or puffy gums, or are experiencing bleeding during normal brushing and flossing – call us. The sooner periodontitis is identified the easier it is to treat and the less expensive it is for you, if you have any concerns about your oral health just remember that a professional evaluation is never harmful and may offer you some great information.

DR. IZZY NAEM

Garfield Ridge Dentistry
6508 West Archer Avenue, Suite 5
Chicago, IL 60638 (map)
Phone: (773) 586-5522

Dental Edge

4941 N. Kedzie

Chicago, IL 60625 (map)
Phone: (773) 681-0668